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Welcome to the 2019 Pedagogy & Theatre of the Oppressed Conference Schedule!

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Friday, June 14
 

9:00am MDT

El Movimiento Sigue: A Statewide Panel on the Chicanx Movement
This panel will be a discussion of the past, present, and future of the Chicanx Movement with key activists from across Colorado whose involvement spans decades. Panelists from a multitude of perspectives will discuss the impact of the movement in the 70s and 80s and how it continues to play a role in our lives now and in the future.

This session will be followed by a Children of the Chicanx Movement breakout session later in the conference.


Speakers
avatar for Juan Espinosa

Juan Espinosa

In his five decade career, Juan Espinosa helped found two independent Chicano newspapers, became a reporter, editor and columnist for The Pueblo Chieftain, and taught Chicano studies part-time for 14 years at the high school and college levels. His photography of the Chicano Movement... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Priscilla Falcon

Dr. Priscilla Falcon

Dr. Priscilla Falcon’s family roots are in northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado which has a been a crucible of struggle over centuries. Priscilla became an early member of the United Mexican American Students, UMAS where she joined others in advocating educational opportunities... Read More →
avatar for Dario Madrid

Dario Madrid

Dario Madrid is a longtime activist in Pueblo and a founder of La Gente Por La Raza. He has been involved in the safety of pedestrian crossings and the betterment of the local educational system. He was also instrumental in the United Mexican American Students organization at the... Read More →
avatar for Shirley Romero Otero

Shirley Romero Otero

Shirley Romero Otero, is the proud mother of four and grandmother of two. She began her Chicana activism in 1977 as the co-founder of the Land Rights Council, in Chama, CO. LRC is an organization dedicated to regaining the “historical use rights” for the heirs of the Sangre de... Read More →
avatar for Ricardo Romero

Ricardo Romero

Ricardo Romero is an 11th generation Chicano with roots in Mora, New Mexico and southern Colorado. In the 1960’s he was one of the founding members of both the Crusade for Justice and Escuela Tlatelolco and served as the National Coordinator of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington... Read More →
avatar for Rita Martinez

Rita Martinez

Rita Martinez is a long time Chicana activist in the Chicano, Mexicano and Indio communities. She began her social justice work of 43 years joining the staff of La Cucaracha newspaper as she became involved with police brutality issues. Martinez has been an advocate for students and... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Reimagining Public Education Through Collaboration: A Pathways2Teaching Approach
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This presentation/talk discusses Pathways2Teaching, a grow-your-own-teacher program, and the ways in which P2T is challenging barriers to education for students of Color. This talk will be in collaboration with the students from PACE to discuss how our work strives towards liberatory practices and education. 

Abstract: This presentation will discuss why and how a Critical Race Curriculum (CRC), supported by elements of a Freirean liberatory education, is currently being implemented in multiple high schools to encourage students of Color to enter the teacher workforce. Through this interactive session, attendees will: learn of an innovative approach to diversifying the teacher workforce through a “grow your own” teacher program for high school students of Color; learn how CRC, Pedagogy of the Oppressed (PO), and Critical Pedagogy (CP) are used to help high school students understand and challenge oppressive schooling experiences by questioning and acting upon policies and practices in public schools that do not lead to equitable access and outcomes (Yosso, 2002); and hear about the impact of the program on student and teacher learning and their ability to question the impact of policies and practices that seek to marginalize and oppress. The NCES (2016) reported that of the 3.1 million teachers currently in service at our nation’s public schools, 6% are Latinx, 7% are African American, and in schools where most of the students are Native/Indigenous, only 19% of its teachers are Native. Pathways2Teaching disrupts these current workforce statistics through CRC, PO, and Critical Pedagogy, allowing students to examine policies for ways in which their communities have been wronged, and collaborate through research, fieldwork, and public presentations on ways to make it right (Tandon, Bianco, & Zion, 2015). 

Challenging Questions
1. How many teachers of Color did you have growing up?
2. How did teachers of Color (or lack thereof) impact your education and the potential barriers you faced in school?
3.  How can we reimagine a liberatory public education that embraces and supports diversity and inclusiveness of all students?  

Speakers
avatar for Robin Brandehoff

Robin Brandehoff

University of Colorado Denver
I am a PhD candidate at University of Colorado Denver in the School of Education and Human Development.  My background is in Theatre Performance and Dramaturgy, both of which I have used to work with gang-affiliated youth in high school classrooms before pursuing my doctorate.  I... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Adapting Conventional Techniques for Revolutionary Purposes
Limited Capacity seats available

Title #1: "“Four legs badass, two legs wasteman!” –  Reimagining Orwell for Austerity Britain"
Presenter: James Kenworth
Description: "Man's the enemy. Always was. Always will be. Whose side are you on?"
Abstract: In 2014, I was given special permission by AM heath Agents on behalf of the George Orwell estate to adapt and modernise Orwell’s classic satire, Animal Farm, and give it a fresh, contemporary twist, injecting its timeless tale of a revolution that went wrong with a gritty, urban, ‘in-yer-face’ language.  

The play was unique in another respect: it was staged on one of London’s longest established and largest inner city farms: Newham City Farm,
with The Independent’s Paul Taylor calling the play “a terrifically powerful update of Orwell’s classic”.

In this paper, I will explore the process/methodology of adapting a literary classic with a contemporary spin, with special emphasis on a creative and expressive approach to playwriting language/dialogue. The paper will also address the challenges of setting the play on an inner city farm and how the use of non-conventional theatre spaces affects and reconfigures the relationship between a play and audience.
 
Title #2: "Is Grading Inherently Oppressive?"
Presenter: Ken Burak
Description: Let’s talk about grading.Can we truly engage in Friere-inspired critical pedagogy if we maintain the hierarchical relationship of grader-graded?  What alternatives are there?  What about self-grading?
Abstract: Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed invite us to engage in pedagogical strategies that challenge the hierarchical, oppressive relationship of Teacher/Student and Actor/Spectator respectively.  But can we do so effectively if we grade our students, leaving in place the hierarchical relationship grader/graded?

After a brief presentation on how I personally came to question grading, including a review of grading abolitionist Alfie Kohn -- as well as on my practice of not grading my students – they have been self-grading for almost ten years – I will facilitate a discussion about grading, exploring such questions as:

1. Is grading inherently oppressive? Are there non-oppressive ways of grading?
2. Does grading counteract our efforts to create lifelong learners by teaching students to identify learning with school?
3. According to the theory of the overjustification effect, extrinsic motivation (rewards and punishments) tends to erode intrinsic motivation. By bribing our students with the rewards of good grades and threatening them with the punishment of bad ones, are we killing their intrinsic motivation to learn, their curiosity?
4. In an ideal world, without any pressure from our employers in academic institutions, what alternatives might there be to grading?
5. In our actual world, where we are pressured by our employers in academic institutions to grade our students, what alternatives to grading are possible?
6. What has your experience grading, or not grading, students been? What has your experience of being graded, or not being graded, been?

I don’t plan to come to this session with answers, but rather to create a space for educators and students to discuss and learn from one another’s wisdom and experience. 

Speakers
KB

Ken Burak

Professor of Philosophy, Northampton Community College
I have been teaching Philosophy from a liberatory and social justice perspective for over twenty years and my work has been heavily influenced, in content and form, by the traditions of Friere and Boal.  My PhD dissertation title was "Logic and Resistance: Reading Hegel in the Age... Read More →
JK

James Kenworth

Middlesex University
I am a Creative Writing Lecturer/Academic and Professional Playwright and have been engaged in writing plays for socially engaged and urban community-based theatre, which involve a collaboration between professional actors and young people from economically deprived areas of London... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
ASG Meeting Room 202 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Parar el abuso en el lugar de trabajo
Limited Capacity seats available

Presentacion de la organizacion CWC como afitrion de la precentacion con 4 esenas de trabajadores actuando y mostrando el abuso que ellos sufren en fabricas de trabajo.

Speakers
FA

Freddy Amador

Chicago Workers' Collaborative


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Great Plains 006a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

10:45am MDT

Disability Justice & Accessibility in Theatre of the Oppressed
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Join this discussion on developing guidelines for TO facilitators on prioritizing disability justice and accessibility in their workshops.  Lead by your friendly local queercrip PTO co-president.

Abstract: As an embodied practice, Theatre of the Oppressed must be rooted in the needs and leadership of disabled people!  Please join this brainstorming session to come up with ideas on language and practices that TO jokers can model in their facilitation and how TO practitioners can intervene when ableism occurs during workshops.  After the workshop, PTO will compile these ideas into a freely distributable toolkit for TO practitioners and we will include credit in the toolkit for anyone who contributes (if they want to be listed as a contributor).

People with ANY disabilities welcome including developmental and cognitive disabilities, physical disabilities, mobility disabilities, neurodivergence (autistic, ADHD, experiencing psychosis, attachment differences, PTSD, etc), mental illness, sensory disabilities, chronic illness, etc.  In other words, we are defining “disability” using the social definition of disability by recognizing that people with disabilities includes anyone who experiences systemic inequity as a result of how they naturally live and function.  Professional diagnoses and self-diagnoses welcome, and no one will be expected to disclose their disabilities.  People without disabilities are welcome to attend if they have experience in disability justice work.  However, this is not an educational session for people without disabilities.  If you do not have disabilities, please come prepared to take a back seat to the input of those with disabilities.  Thank you! 

Challenging Questions
1.    What does ableism look like in Theatre of the Oppressed workshops?
2. What are examples of leadership and practice that would be rooted in disability justice and prioritize accessibility when facilitating Theatre of the Oppressed workshops?
3. What standards should be set in place for facilitators to ensure accessibility and leadership of people with disabilities in TO work?
 

Speakers
avatar for Skye Kantola

Skye Kantola

Artist & Program Coordinator, Faerie Bear Art & MESA
Skye is a violence prevention educator, a community organizer, and an engaged artist. Skye’s passion for violence prevention, PO and TO in education and social change, and art is rooted in their experiences a disabled trans person, a survivor, and borne in part from their experience... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Monarch (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Open Self Care Space
Please feel free to stop by this space if you'd like some quiet time to re-center yourself.  Stim toys, art supplies, and some other options will be available to process and de-stress.

Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Our Daily Poems: Poetry of Witness and the Activist
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: In this generative workshop, we will rely on Carolyn Forché’s “Poetry of Witness” to explore how we can use the personal and the political to enter a poem’s social space. We will examine influential poems and determine how we not only bear witness to historical moments, but how we also write to discover our role as the activist poet. All skill levels are welcome. 

Speakers
avatar for Juan Morales

Juan Morales

Department Chair, English & World Languages, CSU-Pueblo


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Wolf Den 005 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Unpacking Oppression and Privilege in a Carceral Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This workshop application will explore the successes and failures of unpacking oppression and privilege in a carceral classroom setting. 

Abstract: In our workshop application, the "free-world" students who participated in a higher education program in a women's prison will present on the ways in which a pedagogy of the oppressed were successfully used to move us towards a liberatory classroom setting, albeit limited by the carceral context. Additionally, we will explore how the tangible social and material differences among "free-world" students and incarcerated students pose roadblocks to a liberatory educational praxis. We will attempt to represent our incarcerated peers to the best of our ability, and under their guidance and direction. This workshop will be a collaboration between free-world and incarcerated students, and will involve a short presentation on the program, interactive theatre exercises, spoken word pieces, and discussion questions for the audience. 

Challenging Questions
1. How can a pedagogy of the oppressed support incarcerated people?
2. How useful is such a pedagogy within a carceral classroom in which half of the room will remain in the world's largest caging system for years (or, in some cases, their natural lives)?
3. How do we explore injustices in a productive way among a disenfranchised population? 

Speakers
DC

Dr. Colleen Hackett

Colorado State University - Pueblo
I am a scholar activist and have participated in two previous PTO conferences (Omaha, NE and Chicago, IL). My research and activism occur within carceral spaces - specifically, I work with incarcerated women and study the gendered effects of human caging systems. Most recently I have... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Serena 207 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Using Modified TO Techniques with High School Students!
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This workshop presented by Grand Valley State University’s ReACT! troupe will look at how university students use modified TO techniques in interactive performances for High School audiences. 

Speakers
AC

Alex Coy

Production Manager, ReACT!
My name is Alexander Coy, and I am the production manager for ReACT!, a theatre group from Grand Valley State University. ReACT! is an anti-violence peer theatre education troupe that uses dynamic performance techniques to investigate ways of creating positive social change and decreasing... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Introduction to Techniques of Theatre of the Oppressed
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: In a relatively-short workshop, participants will learn about the history and theory of Theatre of the Oppressed and quickly move to numerous games that anchor T.O., ending with Forum basics. 

Abstract: Along with others, I have offered this workshop for many conferences.  It was inserted into conferences because participants who had no familiarity with T.O. (and/or with P.O.) requested a brief but fulsome intro workshop.  It begins of course with "come closer, come closer", then includes an introduction to the early history and theory of T.O. (and it's relationship to P.O.) , numerous games that represent Boal's desire to de-mechanize and dynamize the senses.  The conclusion uses Boal's Subway as a model of basic Forum Theatre and roles of the protagonist, antagonist(s), bystanders, and allies.  Questions are welcome any time, and a period of time at the end for final questions concludes the workshop. 

Challenging Questions
1. What do you know of Boal/Freire and/or of TO/PO?
2. Why is the metaphor of monologue and dialogue important?
3. To what does a workshop lead beside and beyond mere experience? 

Speakers
avatar for Doug Paterson

Doug Paterson

Emeritus Professor, University of Nebraska @ Omaha
I was instrumental in starting PTO in Omaha in 1995 and have been using it in communities and teaching the techniques since then.  Currently I am working with a radical group, Omaha Tenants United, and have dangled the possibility of the group doing some TO.  Also, my wife, Marghee... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Vice or Not Vice: Group Play Writing Combining Social Issues and Topics in a Group Setting
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: To Vice or not To Vice? That is the Question. In this workshop, participants are encouraged to begin the process of writing a play in a group setting with a technique combined with TO games & images.

Abstract: This workshop would begin with a brief introduction to what is hoped to be accomplished in this brief 90 minute session. We would then start with some theatre of the oppressed games so the facilitator can begin understanding the group and people can share and learn each others names.  We would then create a list of social issues topics and themes and use the technique Vice and Not Vice to a total of 3 Vices to create our play. We would then do an introduction to image theatre and create 3 images using those vices where ever participant is encouraged to be a character in the play. The images we hope to create would be a beginning, middle, and end. We would have a quick reflection for people to share what we saw and then create a play arch collectively. People will then be split into small teams of 2-3 and have 10 minutes to write their scenes. After the 10 minutes, the facilitator will check in with everyone and see if they need more time though they will be encouraged to finish there last thought and come back into a group circle. The facilitator will attempt to create a space for the teams to share, after everyone who wanted to share had the chance to share, we will do an overall reflection of the workshop to close it out.  

Challenging Questions
1. How can young students and participants create spaces where they can continue creating new work?
2. How can we continue using theatre as a tool for being intersectional when combining social issues and themes outside of a play writing environment?
3. How can we work to benefit the group as a whole and push through our the focus on ones own ideas; further, how can we let go of selfish emotions for the sake of creativity? 

Speakers
avatar for Ethan Kankula

Ethan Kankula

Alt Space
Ethan is a Theatre of the Oppressed practitioner and teaching artist that has had the honor of working at theatres in the Detroit area such as, Open Book, Outvisible, Matrix, Monster Box, B&B, Shakespeare In Detroit, and Wild Swan. He is currently directing a psychological thriller... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Tundra 008a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

12:15pm MDT

LUNCH!
Lunch is provided by PTO and will be set up in the lobby outside the Ballroom on the main floor (or outside the main doors to Occhiato University Center, weather permitting). Indoor seating will be available in the Ballroom.

Friday June 14, 2019 12:15pm - 1:30pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

1:30pm MDT

Unbound: The Story of the Romero Theater Troupe (film screening)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Romero Theater Troupe, a social justice and activist theater organization, uses the stage in Denver, Colorado to build solidarity and power among the community. This film uses an anthropological lens to examine how a theater organization with community members instead of professional actors can bring change and hope to the Denver community.Written by Michael Kilman
 

Speakers
avatar for Romero Theater Troupe

Romero Theater Troupe

Romero Theater Troupe
The Romero Theater Troupe is an all-volunteer community organic theater collective consisting of dozens of activists, educators, students, assorted troublemakers, and other non-actors. Our mission is to use the stage to preserve important and unknown human rights history and to highlight... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
ASG Meeting Room 202 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

1:30pm MDT

Children of the Chicanx Movement
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is a continuation of the all-conference session, El Movimiento Sigue: A Statewide Panel on the Chicanx Movement. Featuring children of the leaders of the movement, this panel and discussion will address the work of current generations in continuing to organize within the Chicanx Movement.


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Monarch (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Image Theater and The Principals of Recovery for Movements
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This session will look at challenges to movement building and movement "success" through the lens of recovery as established in the 12 steps and 12 traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous. 

Abstract: Using Theater of the Oppressed games and Image Theater techniques, participants will review the 12 steps as they will have been adapted specifically for working in a non-religious, gender-neutral context. The group will explore how the practices outlined in recovery programs can be applied within the context of liberatory practice. Participants will create images of those aspects of "self" present for self, community and movement space and explore what manifestation of "higher power" might be required to overcome these "defects". 

Challenging Questions
1. What are the "defects" that you recognize as preventing forward momentum for you, your community, social justice groups concerning liberatory practice and how might it be considered on the scale of entire movements?

2. What concept of higher power can you embrace outside of a religious concept that might revive and sustain you, your community and/or social justice groups concerning liberatory practice?

3. What name might be given to the compulsions that negatively affect your own ability, your community and movement groups to engage effectively in liberatory practices?
 

Speakers
avatar for Reg Flowers

Reg Flowers

Organizer, Falconworks Theater Company
Reg Flowers began their career as a theater artist, on and off- Broadway, with several guest starring television appearances. They are founder of Falconworks Theater Company a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that uses popular theater techniques to build capacities for civic engagement and... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Open Self Care Space
Please feel free to stop by this space if you'd like some quiet time to re-center yourself.  Stim toys, art supplies, and some other options will be available to process and de-stress.

Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

From Playing to Learning to Change: Amani Peoples Theatre Multi-Arts Approaches Experiential Journey of Liberation with Kenyan indigenous Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Multi-arts methodology and journey of liberation with indigenous people as they respond to myriad challenges ranging from ethnically instigated violence to armed militia fighting for land rights.

Abstract:  An experiential workshop that will see the participants literally “walk the journey of the oppressed.The case study presents the journey of one community in Mt. Elgon Kenya who went through atrocities ranging from destruction of properties, to rape and defilement and killings of people, as different clans and ethnic communities in Mt. Elgon region at the border of Kenya and Uganda went through the worst nightmare of their lives. Fighting for community land rights, the conflict escalated to genocide levels, as different communities took up arms to defend their rights to land against encroachment from other communities. This is perhaps one of the worst human rights violations that Kenya has experienced in the recent past. Which  lead to the worst human rights violations.

Challenging Questions
1. How can we use theatre  of the oppressed in conflict transformation?
2. How can we share our stories/ experiences in kenya with countries?
3. How can indigenous people  respond to myriad challenges ranging from ethnically instigated violence to armed militia fighting for land rights in the republic of Kenya? 

 

Speakers
MO

Maxwel Okuto

Director, Amani People\\\\\\\'s Theatre
Maxwel is an applied theatre practitioner in the field of theatre and development , theatre of the oppressed and Story telling with experience in Human rights, Peace and Conflict Transformation, Advocacy, and Mentoring youths .Has over 8 years of experience in local civil society... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
VAIL 001 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Introduction to Pedagogy of the Oppressed: Conscientization and Problematization
Limited Capacity seats available

In this hands-on workshop we'll explore foundational concepts of Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed and how they can underscore community analysis of oppressions and ways to take action. With praxis as our goal we'll build culture circles to generate themes for analysis, reflection, and action!

Speakers
avatar for Charles Adams

Charles Adams

University of Minnesota
I've been practicing both PO and TO since 1995 in both school and community settings. I'm also on the board of PTO. 
avatar for Mary C. Parker

Mary C. Parker

Master's Student, Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
Mary C. Parker is a Master’s student studying Applied Theatre at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in London, England and Board of Director for Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed, Inc. Prior to returning to school, Mary utilized her expertise in dialogue facilitation and... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Workshopping Ways of Encountering Self / Encountering Others: A Participatory Sharing of Theatrical, Digital, and Art Installation Performance Practices (DOUBLE SESSION)
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This workshop examines three methods of liberationist performance of identity in relation to community: live, scripted theatre; digital storytelling forums; and pop-up art installation performance. 

Abstract: Christina Rodriguez De Conte reimagines TO for live, solo performance.  By performing her story, My Very Own Cuban American Story of Origin, she showcases a performance of personal search for identity.  She explores how the witnessing live performance, coupled with Theatre of the Oppressed tools, and story circles, can inspire participants to devise their own micro-theatrical story of origin.

A South Asian academic, immigrant, and community-based researcher, Jashodhara Sen’s project, Leaving Home, Finding Home, sees digital storytelling as a communicative practice, providing lasting and safe platforms for creating community. Sen’s digital forum is an open-access website for South Asian women to network and share stories about home, identity, freedom, and equality. Sen works beyond conventional theatre spaces with diverse communities, initiating dialogue about immigration and migration. Sen shares excerpts from her project, inviting participants to reflect on how digital media relates to their own work, stories, networks of solidarity, and safe spaces.

Bridget Close and Aaron Ellis draw upon Close’s eco-centric art and movement practices, and Ellis’s Other-centric activism, scholarship, and performance work. They develop embodied processes for de-centering “self” and re-centering marginalized “Others.” They curate relevant material to create temporary “constellations” that inform their ongoing embodied responses to institutional and interpersonal injustice and oppression. Close and Ellis will present a pop-up performance installation of their embodied process. Afterwards, participants are invited to curate their own “constellations” and generate personal movement practices to support their liberationist work.
 
Challenging Questions
1. In this session, we see examples of theatrical production, digital storytelling, and art installation performance: what differences/overlaps do you see in these distinct approaches to liberatory performance practice?

2. Have you witnessed or participated in theatrical, digital, and/or art installation exploration of “identity” before? If so, how do these experiences relate to this workshop, especially relative to liberationist politics and practice?

3. How was your experience of this workshop – what did you notice, what struck you, what will you take away from it, and why? How does (or doesn't) this workshop inspire your work for justice?
 

Speakers
JS

Jashadora Sen

PhD candidate/part time instructor, CU Boulder
AE

Aaron Ellis

Florida State University School of Theatre / School of Dance
Aaron Ellis is a PhD Candidate in Florida State University (FSU) School of Theatre. In his dissertation research, Ellis uses ethnographic methods to study the Bronx-based work of an Italy-based theatre company, the Open Program of the Workcenter of J. Grotowski and T. Richards. He... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 4:45pm MDT
Tundra 008a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Integrating Arts-Based Practices: Further Explorations of Theatre of the Oppressed and Photovoice (DOUBLE SESSION)
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: In this applications workshop, participants engage in an innovative process that integrates practices of Photovoice (community-based, documentary photography), Image Theatre, and Rainbow of Desire. 

Abstract:  At the 2017 PTO Conference, we facilitated a session on using Photovoice to inspire Theatre of the Oppressed, with a specific focus on Image Theater. Rooted in feminist theories and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed (education for critical consciousness, in particular), Photovoice is a participatory documentary photography process that enables people to promote critical dialogue and produce shared knowledge to make change (Wang & Burris, 1997). We wanted participants to consider how a Photovoice process (taking photos, storytelling, reflection) could influence Image Theatre-making in interesting ways. We received positive feedback on our session, with one of our participants declaring “this was a beautiful process.”

At a 2018 national conference for educational developers, we co-facilitated a session that engaged a largely non-theatre participant group in Photovoice and T.O. activities as powerful tools for advancing liberatory classroom and institutional spaces. At this conference, we extended our 2017 PTO conference session structure and introduced Rainbow of Desire methods into the mix. Our ongoing experimentation of this integrated group of arts-based practices--Photovoice, Image Theatre, and Rainbow of Desire--enables participants from diverse professional backgrounds to consider a variety of creative and embodied tools to enact multi-level change.

In this participatory workshop, we will practice a sequence of Photovoice and embodied activities, reflect on the process and its impacts, and discuss potential applications. Our goal is for participants to consider the benefits of integrating visual, storytelling, and TO approaches to advance liberatory practices.

Challenging Questions
1. What is Photovoice, and why might we use it in concert with Theatre of the Oppressed?
2. What are the praxis connections between Photovoice and Theatre of the Oppressed (e.g., theoretical, methodological, pedagogical)?
3. How could this integrated, iterative process be used in community, educational, organizational, and institutional settings to promote solidarity and liberation?

 
 

Speakers
avatar for Tikka Sears

Tikka Sears

Director, Theater for Change UW
Tikka Sears is the co-founder and director of Theater for Change at the University of Washington. As a theater director, performer and teaching artist, she creates original works fusing arts-based pedagogy, Theatre of the Oppressed, physical theater, and community-based performance... Read More →
avatar for Theresa Ronquillo

Theresa Ronquillo

Assistant Director, Center for Teaching & Learning Excellence, Virginia Commonwealth University
I am Filipina American. Daughter of immigrants. Born in Detroit. Lived in the Midwest until age 30.  Twelve year stint in the Pacific NW. Currently live in the South. Unmoored. Parent. Partner. PhD. Writer. Social Worker. Educator. Educational Developer. Learner. Theatre of the Oppressed... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 4:45pm MDT
Great Plains 006a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

To Counteract Abuse in Health Care with Forum Play: A pilot study with doctors and nurses in Sri Lanka (DOUBLE SESSION)
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: We use Forum Play to explore experiences of abuse in health care. A joker leads the work from warm up exercises to short improvised plays based on the participant’s stories. 

Abstract: This workshop starts with a short presentation of a research project conducted in Colombo, Sri Lanka, evaluating Forum Play as an intervention against abuse in health care (AHC). Then we use Forum Play to explore our own experiences in health care. A joker leads the work from warm up exercises to short improvised plays based on the participant’s stories.

Studies show that AHC is prevalent, causing long lasting suffering in patients. Important aspects may be dehumanization and/or discrimination. The aim of this project was to assess the possibilities for using a participatory theatre technique, Forum Play, as a method for reducing/preventing AHC.

We offered four workshops, two with medical doctors and two with nurses. The workshops were led by a Joker and lasted four hours. Focus was on collaborative exploration of AHC situations, identified by the participants. Before and after the workshop participants answered a questionnaire about AHC, and focus group discussions were held after each workshop.

Our study showed that Forum Play is an eye-opener, useful to promote critical thinking and create awareness. As the workshops unfolded and the participants became comfortable with the situation, more stories were told and AHC became a shared experience. At the follow up participants more often reported that they had been involved personally in cases of AHC compared to before the workshop.

The project not only promote critical thinking by questioning power hierarchies within health care, it also puts the spotlight on power asymmetries based on gender and ethnicity. It empowered people by showing a broad repertoire of alternatives in situations characterized by power asymmetries.

Challenging Questions
1.  What patient stories are there that tell about abuse and power asymmetries in health care?
2. What kind of power does the patient possess to prevent abuse in health care?
3. How can Forum Play prepare health care staff to counteract abuse in health care?
 

 

Speakers
KS

Katarina Swahnberg

Professor, Linnaeus University
Katarina Swahnberg professor in Global health has conducted research interventions using Forum Theatre and Forum Play in different projects to counteract abuse in health care (Sweden and Sri Lanka), and violence against women and trafficking (Nepal), starting 2008.


Friday June 14, 2019 1:30pm - 4:45pm MDT
Wolf Den 005 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

Resisting the School to Prison Pipeline
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Shirley Romero Otero

Shirley Romero Otero

Shirley Romero Otero, is the proud mother of four and grandmother of two. She began her Chicana activism in 1977 as the co-founder of the Land Rights Council, in Chama, CO. LRC is an organization dedicated to regaining the “historical use rights” for the heirs of the Sangre de... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Velia Rincon

Dr. Velia Rincon

Dr. Velia Rincon is a first generation Chicana born in Guymon, Oklahoma and raised in Fruita, Colorado. Her parents were born in Chihuahua, Mexico and began their life in the United States from humble beginnings as fieldworkers. In 2000, she completed a Bachelor of Science degree... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

Introduction to Harm Reduction
Limited Capacity seats available

The topics to be discussed will be: what is harm reduction (and what it’s not)/why harm reduction, drug use info/trauma (broadly and locally) and how this relates to the history and current situation in Pueblo, and how harm reduction is integral to social justice movements and community building.

Presenter Bios: 

Rachel Donohue-Dupler is a clinical social worker and has worked as a community organizer for close to 10 years. Rachel has worked as a Program Director of Syringe Access and oversaw several programs including youth and women’s programs.

Michael Williams has been involved in activism, community organizing, and harm reduction for close to 20 years and was involved in community syringe access outreach in Pueblo before the first syringe access opened in Pueblo.


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Monarch (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

Reports from the Field - Theatre of the Oppressed in Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

Title #1: Demechanization and Intercultural Dialogue 
Presenter: Elliot Leffler
Program Description:  Based on an ethnographic study at an international summer camp, this paper examines theatre games and exercises and their capacity to foster intercultural dialogue.   
Abstract:  Augusto Boal’s games and exercises, which are used broadly in many Applied Theatre programs, are designed to “demechanize” the body and its senses – to break our habits of movement by getting players moving and experiencing the world (and each other) in new and unusual ways.  Physical theatre exercises, such as Viewpoints or clowning work, are similarly used in participatory programs to mobilize people's bodies.  Boal writes about the power of this engagement to liberate our bodies from the routinized patterns of behavior and mind instilled in our capitalist, colonialist world – but less is written about the power of these games to bring people together across cultural differences.  In this paper, I examine the intercultural implications of this kinesthetic play.  I do so by examining the interactions of participants in a theatre program I facilitated at an international peace camp.  The teenage participants included a large and culturally-diverse group of Americans, a large and culturally-diverse group of Iraqis, and smaller groups from Saudi Arabia, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Israel, Germany, and Nigeria.  I argue that as participants engage in this intense physical play, they experience themselves and one another as incorporeal – a term Erin Manning employs to describe a state of constant metamorphosis.  These incorporeal players become less self-conscious and more enmeshed in a collective feeling of ensemble.  They establish a sense of what I call creative intimacy.  This has the potential to lay the groundwork for rich intercultural dialogue, though it also can absorb a group in such a delightful utopic feeling that participants become reluctant to engage in any dialogue that might threaten this new status quo.  

Challenging Questions
1. When have you witnessed this kind of creative intimacy empowering a group to conduct rich intercultural dialogue, and when have you witnessed it constraining a group’s intercultural dialogue?
2. What factors seem to determine whether creative intimacy is ultimately limiting or empowering for intercultural groups?
3. How can jokers successfully move a group toward greater risk-taking when they are reluctant? 

Title #2: End Stigma/End HIV-AIDS: A Forum Theatre  Intervention
Presenter: Robert Huesca
Program Description:  This proposal reports the findings from a three-year activist research project using Forum Theatre to combat stigma surrounding HIV-AIDS testing and treatment in San Antonio, Texas.
Abstract:  Findings from this research contribute to both the literature on Forum Theatre and participatory communication for social change. First, this study demonstrates the utility of systematic interviewing in crafting the Forum Theatre performances. Previous research calls for the participation of affected populations in the crafting of performances, but fails to provide much guidance on how this might be done systematically. Second, the performances affirmed the value of participatory communication in theatre as audiences developed multiple, creative interventions to confront stigma at the individual, institutional, and community levels.

Challenging Questions
1. Can systematic interviewing enhance the development of theatrical narratives?
2. What strategies and techniques are suitable for moving from data collection to theatrical production?
3. How do we respond to the reproduction of oppression by “spect-actors?” 

Speakers
RH

Robert Huesca

Professor, Trinity University
I am a Professor of Communication with a research history in participatory communication for social change. My work with Theatre of the Oppressed is in the form of a summer 2018 collaboration with 3 students, 2 community members, and two professors, one of whom has a lengthy history... Read More →
EL

Elliot Leffler

Assistant of Theatre and Performance Studies Professor, University of Toronto
Elliot Leffler is a scholar, director, performer, and facilitator of applied theatre projects. In his research and in the creative projects he leads, Elliot primarily explores how theatre can be used as a catalyst for intercultural and interfaith dialogue. He has led theatre projects... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
ASG Meeting Room 202 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

3:15pm MDT

Open Self Care Space
Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

The Praxis Forest: A Model for Community Organizing
This session explores community praxis through collective analysis and action planning using the Freirean technique of problematization and action trees to transform real world problems.  We'll work together to understand the complexity of a problem and come up with actions to help overcome in within a community.



Speakers
avatar for Charles Adams

Charles Adams

University of Minnesota
I've been practicing both PO and TO since 1995 in both school and community settings. I'm also on the board of PTO. 


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

Transformative Theater in 90 Minutes
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: The idea of creating a full play, particularly in a limited amount of time and with a group of people not always familiar with theatre, can be intimidating. This five-panel Image Theater process, developed with Pace University students, makes play development more accessible, regardless of experience. 

Speakers
AE

Aidan Everly

Student, Pace University
Aidan is thrilled to be here in Pueblo for the 2019 PTO Conference. He is a BFA Acting major at Pace University. He is very excited to meet and learn from all of you wonderful people! Pronouns: he/him/his. IG: aidan_everly
JL

Jazlyn Lewis

Student, Pace University
Jazlyn is a BFA Acting major at Pace University and is excited to be attending the conference. This is her first conference so please be gentle.
MM

Molly McElaney

Student, Pace University
Molly is a BA Film & Screen Studies and English Literature and Language student. Pronouns are she/her/hers and she is excited to be here for her first PTO conference.


Friday June 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

A People’s History of Colorado
The Romero Theater Troupe is an all-volunteer community organic theater collective consisting of dozens of activists, educators, students, assorted troublemakers, and other non-actors. Our mission is to use the stage to preserve important and unknown human rights history and to highlight the work of present day activists. We believe that theater embeds stories into the oral tradition of communities, into the collective consciousness, contributing in important ways to social change.

The Romero Theater Troupe will also be screening their documentary Unbound: The Story of the Romero Theater Troupe as a breakout session during the conference.


Speakers
avatar for Romero Theater Troupe

Romero Theater Troupe

Romero Theater Troupe
The Romero Theater Troupe is an all-volunteer community organic theater collective consisting of dozens of activists, educators, students, assorted troublemakers, and other non-actors. Our mission is to use the stage to preserve important and unknown human rights history and to highlight... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA
 
Saturday, June 15
 

9:00am MDT

Curanderismo
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Monarch (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

9:00am MDT

Loving Oneself: Engaging in Sustainable Community Activism
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop, participants will join in discussions surrounding stress and burnout, learn how to recognize signs and symptoms of these conditions, and will engage in mindful meditation practices related to healthy coping mechanisms for healing and sustainability.

Presenter Bios:

Maria Vega Clark is a native Puebloan. A progressive activist since participating in the Chicano Movement in the 70’s. Started through high school organizations as well as a member of the Teatro de La Lucha. Attended CU-Boulder Study Abroad Program in Xalapa Vera Cruz, Mexico. Participated in excursions through southern Mexico and Guatemala. Participated in the Longest Walk from Boulder to Pueblo late 1970’s. Background includes Early Childhood Education, the Bilingual Program in Denver, CO, and Community Advocacy for students and families attending public schools.  Received a B.A. in Anthropology through USC – Pueblo with a minor in Spanish. Moved on to receive a Master’s degree in Counseling through Adams State University in 2010. Supportive member of the Cinco de Mayo Committee, Abolish Columbus Day/ Día de La Raza Committee. “I am  usually supporting any cause that needs to be addressed to support the oppressed and help create equality.” Currently teaching High School Spanish.

Yvonne J. Montoya is an Associate Professor of Communication & Rhetoric at Colorado State University-Pueblo. Additionally, she is the Director of the Communication & Rhetoric minor and course director for COMR 103 Speaking & Listening. Dr. Montoya's research interests include work-life wellness, organizational socialization and retention, and communication-centered interventions for coping with stress and trauma.  Her Ph.D. is in Communication with an emphasis in organizational communication. She also holds a Master's degree in Organizational Management and a Bachelor's degree in Communication. She has taught numerous face-to-face and online courses and workshops emphasizing interpersonal, organizational, spiritual and intercultural aspects of communication.

Patricia O'Brien is a community organizer and social worker in Pueblo, CO with many years working to end violence against women and abolish the prison industrial complex.



Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Open Self Care Space
Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

A Couch is Not a Home – The Lighthouse Project
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Join us as we shift our perceptions of homelessness with the use of film, musicality and movement, while discussing how we can unite commonly separated groups without the erasure of identity.  

Abstract: ‘A Couch is Not a Home: the Lighthouse Project’ is a workshop designed to challenge how our definition of “home” is in contrast and connection to community. The workshop is a continuation of a collaborative production between Coastal Carolina University students and clients of Project Lighthouse, a haven for homeless youth in Myrtle Beach, SC. Through workshops between these two communities, stories and experiences lit the way into a re-envisioning of societal structures that perpetuate homelessness in order to include their community in critical civic engagement. The project worked to challenge the status quo through various theatrically devised vignettes that examined their perception of homelessness. Using various applied theatre techniques, these two groups confronted their differing levels of privilege while creating an open dialogue about homelessness. As bell hooks states in Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope, “Creating trust usually means finding out what it is we have in common as well as what separates us and makes us different. Lots of people fear encountering difference because they think that honestly naming it will lead to conflict. The truth is our denial of the reality of difference has created ongoing conflict for everyone.” Ultimately, they created a new community that transcends class and celebrates differences. This workshop will use that process as a platform to continue to destigmatize the taboo of homelessness. Through the universality of storytelling, movement and music we will confront the fundamental right to shelter. ‘A Couch is Not a Home’ asks what is home and who can have it. 

Challenging Questions
1. How can people unite across differences, without erasing difference, to build stronger movements for collective liberation?
2. How can we shift the perception of and inclusion of homeless populations, without further destigmatizing these communities?
3. How does capitalism perpetuate homelessness upon those without privilege and then how do those communities reclaim homelessness? How do we decriminalize homelessness and explore the idea that a “home” is more than just four walls and a couch?
 


Speakers
avatar for Amanda Masterpaul

Amanda Masterpaul

Teaching Associate, Coastal Carolina University
Amanda Masterpaul is a Teaching Associate with the Theatre Department, specializing in Applied Theatre and Theatre of the Oppressed practices in addition to teaching Women's and Gender Studies classes at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, SC. She came to the PTO conference for... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Story Circle: Mutual Humanization
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: An interactive, discussion based workshop exploring Freire’s concept of mutual humanization with Story Circle. We’ll share lived experiences to create a space of healing and group connectedness. 

Abstract: Story Circle (SC) was created by members of the Free Southern Theatre during the Civil Rights Movement.  Story Circle is a popular education technique that can be easily implemented by any person and facilitated to the needs of any community.   Participants sit in circles with equidistant spacing, removing physical hierarchies from the structure of each group.  Sitting in a circle also allows participants to see and hear all other participants.  Each participant will have 2 minutes to share a story around a common theme.  Stories can be about their own experiences or an experience of someone close to them.  No story teller is ever cut off from completing their story.   After the Story Circle we will pose reflective questions about how they experienced listening to others’ stories and/or how they experienced sharing their story.  The workshop may end with some Image Theater to support participants as they process their experience.

During this workshop, we will utilize Story Circle to connect our experiences with the Freirean concept of mutual humanization with anti-oppression work and community accountability practices.  This workshop will support community leaders in implementing a new tool for critical conversation and enhance participants’ deep listening skills. Furthermore, Story Circle is an excellent tool for introspection and personal empowerment through a communal experience.  Combining Story Circle with Image Theater can create a powerful tool for understanding complex themes that arise in the daily experiences of individuals.  These techniques also help participants link their individual experiences with the experiences of communities and global issues. 

Challenging Questions
1.  What is an example of mutual humanization you can share during the story circle?
2. What does experiencing mutual humanization feel like?
3. What uses can mutual humanization have in anti-oppression, restorative justice, and/or community accountability practices? What are it’s limits?
 

Speakers
avatar for Skye Kantola

Skye Kantola

Artist & Program Coordinator, Faerie Bear Art & MESA
Skye is a violence prevention educator, a community organizer, and an engaged artist. Skye’s passion for violence prevention, PO and TO in education and social change, and art is rooted in their experiences a disabled trans person, a survivor, and borne in part from their experience... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Serena 207 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

The Story of the Body: Oppression, Yoga, and Theatre
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Explore the history of your body through community connection, gentle yoga, and theatre practices. Experiment with ways to listen, communicate with, and express its story.  

Abstract: For folks experiencing systemic oppression and other forms of trauma, the effects are not theoretical and abstract. They are specifically felt and held in the physical body. Theatre and yoga are active, physical and tangible ways to recognize, respond to, and heal the deep effects of trauma and oppression. Through healing, we hope to find agency and liberation as individuals and communities. Through facilitating, we hope to offer healing practices while actively dismantling toxic power dynamics and the systems of oppression we have been conditioned into.

We begin with a check in, welcoming all voices into the room. We connect as a community through eye contact and shared human emotions. Having created a vulnerable and supportive container to work in, we move into a simple yoga practice that matches movement and breath. We introduce “interoception,” or the sensing of what is happening inside the body. Once we recognize these experiences on a cellular level, we are able to choose how to interact with them. These trauma sensitive yoga techniques will focus on choice making and presence.

Finally, “The Story of the Body” is an exercise in connecting to different parts of the physical body and expressing the stories they reveal to us through movement. The practice involves somatic mediation, written reflection, and creation of statues and movement pieces which embody what we’ve observed. It moves the practice from an internal and felt experience, to a private written experience, to a sharable and expressive experience.

We will address specific ways to make spaces more trauma sensitive (i.e. invitational language, how to encourage agency in a student/teacher relationship.) 

Challenging Questions
1. How do you see oppression being linked to the physical body?
2. How can we honor the cultural integrity of yoga, while also meeting the varied needs of specific populations (i.e. those in substance use treatment facilities, queer and trans spaces, etc.)
3. As leaders, how can we recognize and dismantle oppressive power dynamics we may be perpetuating?
 

Speakers
avatar for Sasha Sigel

Sasha Sigel

I use yoga and theatre, sometimes together and sometimes separately, to offer pathways towards liberation. Theatre for political and social change is my focus as an actor and facilitator, and I teach yoga through a lens of trauma sensitivity. My training is from the University of... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Great Plains 006a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Changing Civic Capacity: Applying Popular Education Pedagogy to Public Money
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Come learn about Participatory Budgeting(PB)--An emerging method that gives the people control over public money. 

Abstract: There is nothing more sexy than public budgets? Am I right? However, despite their power to bore folks to tears, budgets communicate priorities and values more so than any mechanism of politics and public life. And, in an era of widespread resistance and dissatisfaction with the established political parties and governance norms, people are demanding an end to politics as usual, this includes spending tax dollars without involving and engaging the people. 

Here is the good news. Despite the dominance of minimal democracy and non participatory structures, there are proven methods of participatory democracy. This session will focus on one emerging practice: Participatory Budgeting (PB), a process that emerged out of post-dictatorship restructuring in Brazil and for the last 30 years it has demonstrated its potential to increase civic capacity, increase government effectiveness and broaden political participation. PB is a process that allows the public to propose, design and vote on projects that are funded through public funds.

This session will provide an overview of PB, its history, and relevant cases. We will also conduct a mock PB session to get a feel for its potential to transform models of civic engagement. Participants will leave with knowledge of PB cases, a summary of the presenter’s research, and an expanded imagination of the potential for this participatory democratic process. 

Challenging Questions
1. What is PB, and why is it relevant to your work?;
2. How do those who participate in PB demonstrate changes in their civic capacity?;
3. What does a PB process look like, and how does it feel to be a part of it? 

Speakers
AH

Amanda Hudson

Ph.D. Candidate & Education & Research Coordinator, Portland State University
Amanda Hudson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Urban Studies, specializing in Community Development and Popular Education at Portland State University. Her research on Participatory Budgeting focuses on its potential to make civic engagement relevant and fun, and its potential to increase... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Re-Distributing the Means of Vocal Production: Voice Training as a Tool of Political Intervention
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This workshop will combine Boal's exercises with the voice, looking at how voice training can be utilised as a tool of undoing and contesting socially structured oppressions on the voice. 

Abstract: Boal discusses training bodies in the practices of Theatre of the Oppressed as a form of consciousness raising. He describes using theatre to train the body of the participant, 'to raise them to the level of consciousness’ (Boal 2008: 104). Training allows the participant to become aware of how alienation has impacted upon her body: how economic, cultural and social structures mark the body. Training is a training in noticing how the world marks the body and accordingly changes the subject’s relationship to the world. In my practice I have combined Boal’s practice of training bodies as a form of consciousness raising and resistance to bodily alienation with techniques of voice training. I brought together the techniques of prominent voice teachers Kristen Linklater and Patsy Rodenburg with the principles of Theatre of the Oppressed to explore how the voice has been marked by structural repressions of class, gender, race etc., and to what extent this training can provide tools to begin to fight back by resisting and transforming these repressions. I undertook this practice with groups of young women in the United Kingdom, where I led voice workshops that explored the participants’ understanding of political engagement. In this workshop I would like to demonstrate how I applied the principles of Theatre of the Oppressed to the practice of voice training, using the specific example of how I adapted image theatre as a way for the young women to explore oppression and liberation of the voice. Departing from images and dialogue, this workshop focuses on the non-verbal voice as a way to express and articulate both social oppression and vocalisations of resistance against this oppression.
 
Challenging Questions
1. How can the concept of training be used as a liberatory and political practice?
2. How is the voice marked by social structures and how does voice training contest this?
3. How can Theatre of the Oppressed practices specifically target the question of voice?   

Speakers
DS

Dr. Sarah Weston

University of Leeds / Salford Community Theatre
I have been working in community and applied theatre in the north of England for the last 6 years, specifically working with working-class communities in post-industrial cities. I have some experience in Theatre of Oppressed work and Boal technique through working with theatre companies... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Wolf Den 005 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Attaining Educational Equity through Community Schools
This panel will discuss the push and need for educational equity for historically underserved students. The public schools of today are a symptom of an unfair system that is failing to fulfill the promise of providing a gateway to a strong democracy and racial and economic justice. We will delve into the Community Schools Model and how its implementation has the potential to rectify many of the systemic issues plaguing our public schools.

This panel will be followed by a breakout session for those who wish to continue discussing the Community Schools Model in a smaller group.


Speakers
avatar for Chloe Chigro

Chloe Chigro

My name is Chloe Chigro! I am 17 years old and a student at Centennial High School. I am active part of my community by volunteering at the El Pueblo History Museum. In the past, I volunteered at the Rawlings Library, the Southern Colorado Labor Council, and Pueblo Indivisible. I... Read More →
avatar for Robert Donovan

Robert Donovan

Robert Donovan is an educator in Pueblo City Schools, and for the last 6 years he has worked on the East Side of town as a social studies teacher at Risley International Academy of Innovation. In addition to teaching, Robert is a passionate advocate of Community Schools. Through a... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Velia Rincon

Dr. Velia Rincon

Dr. Velia Rincon is a first generation Chicana born in Guymon, Oklahoma and raised in Fruita, Colorado. Her parents were born in Chihuahua, Mexico and began their life in the United States from humble beginnings as fieldworkers. In 2000, she completed a Bachelor of Science degree... Read More →
avatar for Esperanza Saucedo

Esperanza Saucedo

Esperanza Saucedo is a proud mother of 5 children and currently involved with the Pueblo Education Coalition to bring the Community Schools model to our city. For the last four years, Esperanza has worked with the Migrant Education Program and currently serves as the president of... Read More →
avatar for Kyle Serrette

Kyle Serrette

senior policy analyst, National Education Association (NEA)
Kyle Serrette is a senior policy analyst at the National Education Association (NEA). He works with NEA affiliates and allies to form education coalitions, develop campaign strategies, deepen NEA affiliate and ally understanding of key school improvement policies, and helps coordinate... Read More →
avatar for Denise Torrez

Denise Torrez

Denise Torrez is a native Puebloan who has been teaching in Pueblo City Schools for 28 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Colorado State University-Pueblo, a Master’s degree in Bilingual/Bicultural Education from Adams State College, and Principal’s Licensure... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm MDT
Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

12:15pm MDT

LUNCH and PTO Members Meeting
Lunch is provided by PTO and will be set up in the lobby outside the Ballroom on the main floor (or outside the main doors to Occhiato University Center, weather permitting). Indoor seating will be available in the Ballroom.

During lunch we will host the PTO Members Meeting. Come learn more about PTO, how to become a member, and for reports about the organization for all current members. All are welcome!

Saturday June 15, 2019 12:15pm - 1:30pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

1:30pm MDT

Symbols of Resistance: Film Screening and Q&A
Limited Capacity seats available

Symbols of Resistance looks at the history of the Chican@ Movement as it emerges in the 1970s with a focus on events in Colorado and Northern New Mexico. The documentary explores the struggle for land, the student movement, and community struggles against police repression.

Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Serena 207 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

1:30pm MDT

Pueblo Education Coalition
Limited Capacity seats available

Making meaningful change in public education is important, yet difficult work.  Here in Pueblo, we are working at the grassroots level to develop a coalition of stakeholders whose voices are valued and who have a place at the decision making table.  We will discuss our triumphs and tribulations, and have an open dialogue on efforts and strategies moving forward as a community to make positive change in public education.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Donovan

Robert Donovan

Robert Donovan is an educator in Pueblo City Schools, and for the last 6 years he has worked on the East Side of town as a social studies teacher at Risley International Academy of Innovation. In addition to teaching, Robert is a passionate advocate of Community Schools. Through a... Read More →
avatar for Kyle Serrette

Kyle Serrette

senior policy analyst, National Education Association (NEA)
Kyle Serrette is a senior policy analyst at the National Education Association (NEA). He works with NEA affiliates and allies to form education coalitions, develop campaign strategies, deepen NEA affiliate and ally understanding of key school improvement policies, and helps coordinate... Read More →
avatar for Denise Torrez

Denise Torrez

Denise Torrez is a native Puebloan who has been teaching in Pueblo City Schools for 28 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Colorado State University-Pueblo, a Master’s degree in Bilingual/Bicultural Education from Adams State College, and Principal’s Licensure... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

How Our Identities Binds or Blinds Our Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: How do identities we have influence how we facilitate and teach? In this workshop participants will deepen their understanding of self and how it informs our practice and our everyday collaborations. 

Abstract: Using techniques from Theatre of the Oppressed, improv, stand up and playback theatre, we will explore our individual identity.  It is my intention in this workshop to grow more self-aware practitioners so we can continue to responsibly offer support and collaborations to our partners and clients. We will take a closer look at who we are and how that informs how we facilitate and work collaboratively. This workshop is about preparing ourselves to be better practitioners by gaining a greater sense of who we are by looking at our identities and how that influences what we do. Often times we apply the work of Theatre of the Oppressed to clients and partnerships without looking at how that work can allow us as practitioners to gain a better sense of self. What can we learn about ourselves through Boal’s games for actors and non-actors? Possible outcomes may result in a self-care plan, a deeper understanding of the identities we carry that matter most, a list of personal values and how that informs our work professionally, a set of goals and accountability partners to achieve said goals. As an applied theatre practitioner, this is not intended to be therapeutic. In its design, it is about building self-awareness. If there are drama therapists in the network, I am open to collaboration to offer a more intentional therapeutic angle and to serve as additional support in the room for participants.
 
Challenging Questions
1. How do the identities we have influence our practice and influence our collaborations?
2. How does Theatre of the Oppressed influence you personally?
3. How can you allow yourself to fully show up in your practice? 

Speakers
avatar for Mary C. Parker

Mary C. Parker

Master's Student, Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
Mary C. Parker is a Master’s student studying Applied Theatre at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in London, England and Board of Director for Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed, Inc. Prior to returning to school, Mary utilized her expertise in dialogue facilitation and... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Open Self Care Space
Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Connecting Embodied Education with Trauma Healing
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Join several trauma workers in an interactive, embodied workshop on connecting PO & TO to trauma healing work! 

Abstract: This workshop will include: 1) an exploration of unprocessed trauma as an embodied experience, 2) how TO and PO can be a means for integrating trauma in a healing way, and 3) non-TO & PO practices addressing trauma in the body.

This workshop will expose attendees to the neurobiology of trauma and support participants in exploring ways PO, TO, and other embodied practices can be connected to trauma healing work.  This workshop will not be a trauma-healing session in and of itself because we will not have the necessary time together to ethically do deep trauma healing work together. Participants will learn how to use language in a more trauma sensitive way, and how to adapt exercises like traditional TO games and yoga to meet needs of folks with unprocessed trauma. In other words, this workshop will be a sampling platter of healing modalities for folks to further explore.  We will also provide many books and other resources for participants to continue to expand their efforts in connecting trauma healing work with PO, TO, and other embodied practices!  Facilitators will be available after workshop to continue discussion and assist with processing for anyone who would like additional support or have additional questions. 

Challenging Questions
1. How do you experience interoception, attunement, emotions, stress, and enjoyment in the body?
2. What are some of the ways PO & TO can be adapted to explore trauma and integrate trauma in the body towards healing?
3. What are the ethics and limits of using PO & TO in trauma work?
 

Speakers
avatar for Skye Kantola

Skye Kantola

Artist & Program Coordinator, Faerie Bear Art & MESA
Skye is a violence prevention educator, a community organizer, and an engaged artist. Skye’s passion for violence prevention, PO and TO in education and social change, and art is rooted in their experiences a disabled trans person, a survivor, and borne in part from their experience... Read More →
avatar for Sasha Sigel

Sasha Sigel

I use yoga and theatre, sometimes together and sometimes separately, to offer pathways towards liberation. Theatre for political and social change is my focus as an actor and facilitator, and I teach yoga through a lens of trauma sensitivity. My training is from the University of... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Serena 207 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Fortifying the collective: #ForTheCulture
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: How can artists and organizers use Theatre of the Oppressed coupled with other commonly used applied theatre strategies to engage their communities for the purpose of positive culture change? 

Abstract: In Tarana Burke’s Ted Talk for TEDWomen 2018 “Me Too is a movement, not a moment”, Tarana speaks of the numbness that can come from being entrenched in the work to dismantle the same oppression that one currently faces or has experienced in the past. She states “It's measuring the magnitude of this task ahead of you versus your own wavering fortitude. Numbness is not always the absence of feeling. Sometimes it's an accumulation of feelings.” How can artists, organizers and activists use Theatre of the Oppressed strategies to help sustain themselves while working to dismantle and fight against the oppressive forces that face them? Participants will engage in dialogue about trauma informed pedagogy being integrated into the work as well as being mindful about their own trauma informed practices such as intentionally building in self-care, building your toolkit while practicing non-bias facilitation, and cultivating group fortitude in order to maximize your impact while working to dismantle and fight against the oppressive forces. In this presentation, we will be exploring strategies and exercises based in the work Augusto Boal, improv, devising, and the art of story-telling. This workshop will include a performance, group discussion, and active participation providing an opportunity for exploration and experiential learning for practitioners at every level.   

Challenging Questions
1. How can you use Theatre of the Oppressed coupled with other applied theatre techniques to cultivate positive cultural shifts in your community?

2. What creative pathways toward liberation from oppressive forces of colonization and other institutionalized social injustices are you using in our practice with measurable outcomes (how are you documenting or measuring these outcomes?

3. Can you share some of your experiences, exercises, best practices, or literature that has provided you with a greater understanding of PTO? Knowing that prevention efforts or cultural changes require multiple interactions and various techniques has this greater understanding made it easier to integrate other strategies and what are some of those strategies that have proved successful?  

Speakers
SC

Shavonne Coleman

Theatre For Dialogue Specialist, Voices Against Violence, CMHC @ University of Texas at Austin
I went to Grad School at Eastern Michigan University and this is where my interest and education in PTO began. After taking an Interactive theatre course that introduced me Augusto Boal and Theatre of the Oppressed, my professor Anita Rich brought me to the PTO conference. That experience... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Great Plains 006a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

I am in 5th grade and I know about Augusto Boal!
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: The Warehouse Project & Gallery shares techniques used to bring TO and Boal to 5th graders! Participants will walk away with concrete ways to use theatre of the oppressed in the elementary classroom.  

Abstract: The Warehouse Project & Gallery, located in Summit, IL, just outside the City of Chicago, works with youth to deliver positive social change. For the past 6 years, our teaching artists have used Theatre of the Oppressed techniques to inspire young people to confront issues of justice and equity within their lives. Recently, TWPG has been invited to partner with a local elementary school to bring theatre, especially TO practices, into the classroom.  Teaching Artists are devising a 12 week curriculum guided by common core and social emotional learning practices infused with Boal’s techniques to empower students to use their voices as experts in their own stories and inspire change in those around them.  Teaching Artist will bring to life their curriculum, planning and implementation techniques and share successes and challenges during this 90 minute workshop.   

Challenging Questions
1. How do Theatre of the Oppressed techniques work in an elementary school classroom?
2. Does Theatre of the Oppressed enhance learning and understanding of academic concepts?
3. How is Theatre of the Oppressed used to enhance social/emotional learning and build empathy?
 

Speakers
MS

Meredith Schilsky

Chief Creative Director, The Warehouse Project & Gallery
Meredith Schilsky is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and the Chief Creative Director at The Warehouse Project & Gallery a non-profit organization that works with youth to deliver positive social change through the arts.  Combining her passion for theatre and social change, Meredith... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Wolf Den 005 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Improvisation as a Pedagogy for Civic Engagement
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Through improv games and interactive demos, we’ll discuss methods and intervention points for facilitators, educators, and community leaders to examine improvisation in the context of civic engagement 

Abstract: Improv is becoming increasingly appreciated as a tool for social transformation. All over the world, businesses, universities, and community organizations are looking for creative new ways to solve enduring problems, and improv training has become more and more popular for leaders in those spaces. Improvisers train in listening, supporting, and being present – these core principles have a far-reaching resonance, and are vital for successful social justice work.

In this session, participants will explore how the principles of improv can be highlighted in their existing work and/or brought into new social justice spaces to support team-building, productive dialogue, and facilitate group dynamics. We will engage in a series of exercises and interactive demos, and discuss how the underlying principles of improv can enhance existing practices or provide new language or frameworks for leading improv-based activities. Time and space will be provided for participants to play with, explore, and rehearse using key takeaways in their work and lives outside of the workshop. 

Challenging Questions
1. What are the best ways to illuminate the civic engagement opportunities that are latent in a creative process – like Theatre of the Oppressed – that features improvisation as a core component?

2. How can we deepen our understanding of the discipline of improvisation to enhance our social justice work?

3. How do we broaden our understanding of the possibilities of improv-based work, and bring it into other “extra-theatrical” (outside-of-the-theatre) spaces? 

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Hartle

Olivia Hartle

PhD student, Point Park University
Olivia Hartle is a theatre director, improviser, facilitator, and coach, and she is currently working on her PhD in Community Engagement at Point Park University in Pittsburgh, PA. Prior to relocating to Pittsburgh, Olivia was active in the New York theatre scene, where she ran BIG... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
VAIL 001 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

Newspaper Theatre: Analyzing Together for Collective Momentum
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Come explore Boal’s Newspaper Theatre techniques alongside adaptations of them. We’ll build on our 2018 PTO workshop, focusing more on adaptations, but all are welcome, and no experience is necessary! 

Abstract: How can Newspaper theatre help us analyze how information is manipulated and weaponized? How can it help us draw people together in space for collective analysis and collective action? How can it offer us a container for communication that can be quickly mobilized in public space to call collective attention to a problem or oppression? In “The Fourth Category of Popular Theatre: Newspaper Theatre,” Augusto Boal writes, “Newspaper Theatre seeks to popularize ‘the means of making theatre’ so that the people themselves can use them and make their own theatre. To use the analogy present in the title of this method—though we have our own presses, we don’t try to print our own paper and make it popular; our endeavor is to hand over our own presses to the people, so they can print their own paper.” Developed by Augusto Boal and Arena Theatre colleagues, Newspaper Theatre aims to dismantle the "pretended 'objectivity' of most journalism," and it offers an astonishingly portable set of techniques that can be taken up very quickly to make compelling protest theatre to activate public space and connect people in critical exploration. This workshop—facilitated by organizers of the collective/popular theatre space known as Theatre of the Oppressed and Activism in Chicago—includes some focus on Boal's eleven core techniques of Newspaper Theatre, but it builds on previous content that we have shared at PTO, this year with particular focus on contemporary adaptations and variations. We aim for the workshop to be useful to those who have taken other Newspaper Theatre workshops with us before and to those who have not. All are welcome; no experience necessary. Our materials are available in English and Spanish. 

Challenging Questions
1. How can Newspaper theatre help us analyze how information is manipulated and weaponized inside the systems of power we want to change?
2. How can it help us draw people together in space for collective analysis and collective action and thereby work against individualization and privatization?
3. How can it offer us a container for communication that can be quickly mobilized in public space to call collective attention to a problem or oppression?  

Speakers
KH

Kelly Howe

Loyola University Chicago
I teach at Loyola University Chicago, organize a range of school and community workshops, residencies, and community education spaces/opportunities in the Chicago area and beyond, participate in other activism, and am an editor/researcher in the areas of Theatre of the Oppressed and... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Tundra 008a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

1:30pm MDT

“More than a Table, Six Chairs, and a Bottle”: The Great Game of Power as a Tool for Social Analysis
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This workshop will explore the Great Game of Power as outlined in Games for Actors and Non-Actors and how it can be used within a longer process  to identify key issues of power.  

Abstract: This workshop will explore the Great Game of Power which is outlined in Augusto Boal’s Games for Actors and Non-Actors. Boal places this game in the section “The invention of space and the spatial structures of power” so I have found it appropriate as a tool for social analysis and understanding of how power and structures of power work. I have used this activity both for analyzing global power structures but also in particular occupations like student teachers, youth workers, and organizational development consultants. I also have found it provided a good link to “Stand by the Character” whereby in the final steps of the activity, participants stand behind the part of the power structure that they can identify with. I then link this activity to “Image of the Ideal” as well as “Your Wildest Dream” (developed by David Diamond of Theatre for Living) whereby characters/participants discuss in their character/participant groups what next steps can be taken by them in addressing or transforming the power structure. We will both explore this activity and its further potential (or how workshop participants have used it) but also use it as an example for how a simple TO/PO activity can be used within a longer workshop or process to identify key issues of power and to imagine what other activities/.games could enhance its effect. 

Challenging Questions
1. How might an activity such as this be used to enhance understandings of power at both the individual and systemic levels?
2. How would an activity such as this be adapted and/or transformed for particular contexts or goals?
3. What can we learn from this one activity in terms of how we choose activities as part of a longer workshop or organizing process of social analysis and action? 

Speakers
WL

Warren Linds

Associate Professor, Concordia University
Been doing this work for over 30 years. Attended multiple PTO conferences. Primary work has been with Indigenous youth in Western Canada, as well as incorporating the work into critical creative pedagogical practice in my teaching and facilitating. 


Saturday June 15, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

3:15pm MDT

Everything We Do Is Interconnected: Tewa Women United
TWU believes in strengthening and re-strengthening beloved families and communities to end violence against women, girls, and Mother Earth. The mission of TWU is to provide brave, safe spaces for Indigenous women to uncover the power, strength, and skills they possess to become positive forces for transformative change in their families and communities. www.tewawomenunited.org

Speakers
avatar for Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña

Tewa Women United
Beata Tsosie-Peña is from Santa Clara Pueblo and El Rito, NM. She is a mother, poet, seed saver, and is certified in Infant Massage, as a Developmental Specialist, an Educator, and in Indigenous Sustainable Design (permaculture). She is also a Green For All Fellow and has served... Read More →
avatar for Kathy Sanchez

Kathy Sanchez

Tewa Women United
Kathy Sanchez is a founder of Tewa Women United and of the Gathering for Mother Earth. She has engaged in protecting indigenous and is active in anti violence efforts, challenging both interpersonal violence and military, state violence. She is an educator, artist, and community based... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 3:15pm - 4:45pm MDT
Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Tewa Women United: Two World Harmony Butterfly Model
Limited Capacity seats available

Kathy Sanchez and Beata Tsosie from Tewa Women United's Environmental Health and Justice program will present on the Two World Harmony Butterfly Model which demonstrates how to move within contradictory and multiple world views with wholeness in mind, body, and spirit.

Speakers
avatar for Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña

Tewa Women United
Beata Tsosie-Peña is from Santa Clara Pueblo and El Rito, NM. She is a mother, poet, seed saver, and is certified in Infant Massage, as a Developmental Specialist, an Educator, and in Indigenous Sustainable Design (permaculture). She is also a Green For All Fellow and has served... Read More →
avatar for Kathy Sanchez

Kathy Sanchez

Tewa Women United
Kathy Sanchez is a founder of Tewa Women United and of the Gathering for Mother Earth. She has engaged in protecting indigenous and is active in anti violence efforts, challenging both interpersonal violence and military, state violence. She is an educator, artist, and community based... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

My Image, My Conscience, My Story: Image Theatre as a Gateway Between Silence and Blast
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This is a session paper presentation which seeks scruitiny and suggestions for its betterment for publication in the PTO Journal.

Abstract: In the last few decades Africa has seen an upsurge of the use of applied theatre in addressing community issues. In Ghana’s own case, two recent past presidents of the republic recognised in their inaugural speeches (January, 2009 and January, 2013), the potential of Applied Theatre and their thirst to patronise in its use to address community issues, during their terms of office, making applied theatre popular among Ghanaians. Unfortunately, the few theatre practitioners in Ghana who have used applied theatre have focused, mostly, on its use for sensitisation and awareness creation campaigns through plays and post-performance discussion. This paper discusses how other aspects of applied theatre could be used for intervention purposes for personal and community development in Ghana. In this presentation, Augusto Boal’s Image Theatre which was used as an investigation tool to break the silence among irregular migrants in Ghana on issues of social justice, in connection with irregular migration will be used as a case study. The study found that image theatre has high potential of fetching information from research participants in Ghana without coercion or luring but in a most agreeable manner.

Challenging Questions
1. What is the place of Testimonial Theatre in Theatre of the Oppressed
2. Can Image Theatre be used as a research tool?
 
 

Speakers
DF

Dr. Felicia Owusu-Ansah

Professor, University of Ghana
Currently a Lecturer at the Theatre Arts Department of the University of Ghana, Dr Felicia Owusu-Ansah teaches Theatre for Development, Community Theatre, Research Methods, Theatre History among others. She is an applied Theatre Scholar whose research interest and practice focus include... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Trailridge 002 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

The Marxist Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Title: The Marxist Classroom: Exploring the Social Constructions of Alienation of Students from Academic Work and Liberation Through Application of Deci and Ryan’s Self Determination Theory of Personality Development

Presenter: Tucker D. Farris

Abstract: This paper strives to apply Marx’s theory of alienation in the proletariat class in an industrial society to the classroom in higher education. Marx’s viewpoint offers a way to conceptualize student burnout, low performance, low engagement, and lack of intrinsic motivation. Marx wrote that upon industrialization of a society, a social reality is created wherein the working classes are distanced so far from the products they are working to produce, that they experience a dissociation of self to the point that they are no longer personally invested in the work that is consuming their lives. When this line of thought is applied to a sociological study of the modern classroom, we begin to see similarities between our ivory towers and Marx’s factories. Students often feel disenchanted and alienated from their work, and this, as a result, lends to a classroom taking on a similar social reality to that of a factory floor. By conceptualizing the classroom in this way, we are enlightened to a new interpretive lens by which we can better understand the social and personal struggles our students have with the environments we create in their classes. Drawing on my experiences in graduate writing support, I will propose a lens for framing student interactions, with respects to fostering positive identity formation. The methodology serves to promote equity in the classroom by exploring the social factors of alienation, and by attempting to provide direction for educators to frame different socioeconomic, ethnic, or other backgrounds in terms of barriers to positive identity growth.  

Speakers
TD

Tucker D. Farris

Graduate Student, University of Victoria
I am a graduate student at the University of Victoria, I began my work with Pedagogy of the Oppressed when I began studying transformational teaching and experiential education during my undergraduate career in the States. When I moved to graduate school I began applying this work... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
ASG Meeting Room 202 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Texting for Life: Casa Milagro Youth Solutions Performance
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: On teen dating violence & bullying.  The 'Joker' takes the specactors through the journey they will embark on & their opportunity to engage & direct the outcome of the performance with non-violence.  

Presenters: Millie Duran, Shaleeyah Mariney, Willow Tachette, Angel Vieyra, Aaron Vieyra

Abstract: Casa Milagro provides interactive theater performances for youth using the Forum Theater techniques.  Casa Milagro's plays address real-world, real-life problems faced by children and teens. While everyone is impacted in some way by violence in our society, our target audience, 'at-risk youth' are significantly impacted because they have so little power and control over the circumstancess of their lives.  The spectactors can discuss the their motivations and feelings. We ensure representation by all spectactors.  The technique of Forum theatre creates a safe space in which any participant may introduce his or her new ideas and actions for resolving problems presented in our plays in realistic means. Casa Milagro is helping to prepare youth for thoughtful, meaningful and non-violent participation in larger movements for social change by providing a space and tecfhnique that allows them to practice solutions to social problems.  Casa Milagro's work is connected to organizing, action and systems change because we are preparing youth to deal with life's challenges by learning and practicing cooperation, respect and trust. We are active in collaborating with community ogranizations.  We are assisting the leaders and problem solvers of the future in creating themselves. Casa Milagro strives to engrain our message through our program for our youth to recognize the positive and critical thinking skills inside of them. Our performances provide young people with the chance to 'rehearse for life'.  

Challenging Questions
1. How can you make conscious changes in your choices to modify negative behavior that can result in positive outcomes and/or influence others in positive options?
2. How can you walk away from conforming to negative peer/gang pressure for inclusion and acceptance.
3. How can you become more conscious of oppression and inequality from this performance?

Speakers
SM

Shaleeyah Mariney

Casa Milagro Youth Solutions
WT

Willow Tachette

Casa Milagro Youth Solutions
AV

Angel Vieyra

Casa Milagro Youth Solutions
AV

Aaron Vieyra

Casa Milagro Youth Solutions
MD

Millie Duran

Casa Milagro Youth Solutions
Two of the Casa Milagro  Board Members and one of the actors attended training by Augusto Boal in Denver in 2004.  Chair, Millie Duran completed her Masters Degree in Public Administration with an emphasis in Domestic Violence and Policy Development.  Board Member, Vicki Nash had... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Wolf Den 005 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Health Care and the Oppressed
Limited Capacity seats available

Healthcare is now the most pernicious economic issue facing workers - especially the poor.
3.6 trillion dollars every year are transferred from workers earnings to the Medical Industry Complex, a money-making consortium. Each child born today is already harnessed to pay a half-million dollars during their working lives. This session will discuss some of these healthcare issues, and how solutions can only be born at the grass roots level and created by the victims.

Speakers
RR

Richard Rivera

Owner and CEO, HealthTrac, LLC
I am a graduate of the Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health and I have dedicated my career to fixing healthcare. It is the most serious financial issue facing the poor and working class in the USA. It has been progressively impoverishing working Americans... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Serena 207 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Working Class on Stage
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract: This session will focus on two very different experiences in which the theatre is used as a tool to try to organize the working class: the experiences of the Chicago Workers' Collaborative and of the Escola de Teatro Popular (Popular Theatre School- Brazil). 

If these experiences are different because of the countries in which they evolve, they still present many similar aspects: the fact that they both deal with how to create alliances out of the diversity within the class, the fact that they try to show how oppression operates through concrete means, and the fact that the stage is only a step in a bigger process: the struggle against exploitation. 

Speakers

Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Tundra 008a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Open Self Care Space
Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

5:00pm MDT

Affinity Group Magic: Cultivating Care and Transformation Within Our Community Spaces
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: In this experiential, youth-led session, begin work that is truly “for the people, by the people” by playing and practicing For Youth Inquiry’s strategies for creating care filled affinity spaces! 

Abstract: Affinity groups are magic.

TO originated in one particular context, intended to support the organizing of one specific community. Though many folks adapt and apply TO tools in various ways today, including partnering with and training up communities that are not strictly our own, there is a particular potency -- and indeed, magic-- to work that is truly “for the people, by the people.”

How - and when - might we build community specifically with people who share our own salient identities? How might we first infuse such a process with breath and shared language, in service of creating a container for community care? What ideas and creative solutions spring forth then?

In this hands-on, youth-led session, play through some of participatory theatre company For Youth Inquiry (FYI)’s strategies for creating affinity spaces steeped in care. FYI’s 4 Ps Pedagogy - Pleasure, Perspective, Power, and Practice - will frame the experiential exploration. Then, the session will focus on techniques practiced in our current play-in-process, which centers the stories, desires, and dreams of trans and gender nonconforming (TGNC) young people of color. We also ask, what do authentic (and theatrical) invitations -- for support or solidarity-- of cis people, or white folks, look like? Participants will also have the opportunity to draw ties to their own communities and work.

Join us to practice fresh ways to build people power and care for ourselves and our communities. 

Challenging Questions
1. When and why might we form affinity groups? What use do they have to our theatre making, our organizing, the movement?

2. How might we craft and sustain community care?

3. What do authentic invitations (ie. for support or solidarity) to/ward folks outside of our affinity groups look like? How might we make these invitations both theatrical and useful? 

 

Speakers
avatar for Alyssa Vera Ramos

Alyssa Vera Ramos

Artistic Director, For Youth Inquiry (FYI) Performance Company at Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health
I'm a Chicago-based theatre artist, cultural organizer, and facilitator. I am the Artistic Director of For Youth Inquiry (FYI) Performance Company, housed at reproductive justice, youth-serving org, ICAH. I also support and collaborate with youth organizers as Arts Justice Organizer... Read More →


Saturday June 15, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

6:30pm MDT

DINNER!
Dinner is not provided by PTO but there will be a shuttle to take people to Downtown Pueblo if you would like to eat downtown prior to the Conference Celebration.

Saturday June 15, 2019 6:30pm - 8:00pm MDT

8:00pm MDT

Conference Celebration!
Come celebrate with us at Steel City Art Works Gallery! All ages are welcome!

PTO will provide 2 free drink tickets (beer and wine) for those 21+. Please bring a form of ID to receive your tickets. Light refreshments will also be served. Come check out local art at the gallery and mingle with conference attendees. Later, head across the street to The Gold Dust Saloon. PTO has reserved the front patio there for anyone who would like to continue eating, drinking, and celebrating. No alcohol or food from Steel City can be brought across the street, and each person is responsible for their own purchases at Gold Dust Saloon.

Saturday June 15, 2019 8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT
Steel City Art Works Gallery 216 S Union Ave, Pueblo, CO, 81003
 
Sunday, June 16
 

9:00am MDT

¡El Pueblo Unido! - A Collaborative Painting
This collaborative art piece will represent experiences from the pre-conference workshop and the conference. Local artists Ryan Yanke, Wendy Alfonso, Michelle Martinez, and Servenio Martinez will solicit input from participants as to their workshop experiences, as well as from their local community work. Additionally, they will encourage input from conference attendees and presenters throughout the week to capture the emotional tone and energy generated by the conference. All will be able to observe the evolution of the art piece. It will be showcased at the end of the conference.


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Lobby outside Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Boulevard, Pueblo, CO, USA

9:00am MDT

Chat with Board Members - How to Get Involved with Pedagogy & Theatre of the Oppressed, Inc.
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Stop by anytime during this session to meet with board members, ask questions, and learn about some of the ways that you can contribute to PTO, whether you are interested in joining the board or not!

Speakers
avatar for Reg Flowers

Reg Flowers

Organizer, Falconworks Theater Company
Reg Flowers began their career as a theater artist, on and off- Broadway, with several guest starring television appearances. They are founder of Falconworks Theater Company a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that uses popular theater techniques to build capacities for civic engagement and... Read More →
avatar for Skye Kantola

Skye Kantola

Artist & Program Coordinator, Faerie Bear Art & MESA
Skye is a violence prevention educator, a community organizer, and an engaged artist. Skye’s passion for violence prevention, PO and TO in education and social change, and art is rooted in their experiences a disabled trans person, a survivor, and borne in part from their experience... Read More →
avatar for Charles Adams

Charles Adams

University of Minnesota
I've been practicing both PO and TO since 1995 in both school and community settings. I'm also on the board of PTO. 
avatar for Robin Brandehoff

Robin Brandehoff

University of Colorado Denver
I am a PhD candidate at University of Colorado Denver in the School of Education and Human Development.  My background is in Theatre Performance and Dramaturgy, both of which I have used to work with gang-affiliated youth in high school classrooms before pursuing my doctorate.  I... Read More →
avatar for Sasha Sigel

Sasha Sigel

I use yoga and theatre, sometimes together and sometimes separately, to offer pathways towards liberation. Theatre for political and social change is my focus as an actor and facilitator, and I teach yoga through a lens of trauma sensitivity. My training is from the University of... Read More →
FA

Freddy Amador

Chicago Workers' Collaborative


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
ASG Meeting Room 202 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Open Self Care Space
Please feel free to stop by this space if you'd like some quiet time to re-center yourself.  Stim toys, art supplies, and some other options will be available to process and de-stress.

Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Blue Spruce 205 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Supporting Resilience for Artists and Educators
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: This collaborative/interactive session focuses on cultivating resilience while working inside (and challenging) oppressive systems. Session includes discussion, embodied practices, and resources.  

Abstract: This collaborative and interactive session focuses on cultivating personal and creative resilience while working inside (and challenging) oppressive systems. Specifically, we are investigating the most pressing needs related to wholeness and wellness inside educational institutions, creative companies, and community organizations. We speak from the wisdom of our experience as: womxn of color, an immigrant, and as a first generation college graduate.

We will structure the session in three parts, beginning with the panelists sharing their perspectives and experience that prompted this conference offering. Next, we will facilitate three embodied practices that we have found useful for self and community care that may also serve our attendees. These are (tentatively):
  • An active/physical approach to “polling” in a room full of people to encourage civil discourse. This is a twist on the forum and image theatre concepts.
  • Using image theatre to demonstrate abstract concepts such as oppression, patriarchy, etc, and re-shaping them into more positive, evolved figures.
  • An activity in which the group creates a pie chart of how our time is spent, then recreating a pie chart of how we wish our time was spent. We can also use bodies to physicalize this.
  • We will conclude will a facilitated group discussion in which participants can offer their own tools and wisdom on this topic, and provide a printed handout with additional resources and research.  

Challenging Questions
1. What are the pressing needs related to wholeness and wellness for graduate students, theatre artists, and educators?
2. What are three embodied personal practices that cultivate our health and well-being, and fuel our continued work?
3. How can we challenge oppressive systems in order to support more sustainable and meaningful creative and academic pursuits?
 

Speakers
avatar for Stacey Cabaj

Stacey Cabaj

Assistant Professor of Acting and Pedagogy, Loyola Marymount University
Stacey Cabaj is an award-winning actress, performance pedagogy specialist, and voice coach. She holds an M.F.A. in Theatre Pedagogy from Virginia Commonwealth University and a B.F.A. in Musical Theatre from the Boston Conservatory at Berklee, as well as teaching certifications in... Read More →


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Cottonwood 217 (Upper Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

MyVOYCE Creative Expression Performance and Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: My VOYCE Creative Expression is an opportunity to create history with perspective in order to provide a full picture in many voices. 

Abstract: It's all about context. Fighting for justice, no matter the category (racial, economic, social, etc.) is about telling the full story. Or, in other words, it is about telling the truth. The journey to truth is a long and daunting one. But what one learns along the way, and what one is able to then teach, proves to be an invaluable lesson.

Truth telling lies in history with perspective, considering accounts that may not seem academic or research-based. It considers poetry, painting, movies, plays, songs, etc., works of an era that provide a picture in living color, speaking to the soul as well as the mind.

It is with similar performances, and in this workshop, that the ‘My VOYCE’ students of Manual High School will teach their participants to tell the full story, the ones with joy, pain, faith, despair, and perspective. These students will have just undergone a semester of building the framework to speak for themselves and their community through creative expression. Therefore, the three-hour session will begin with their stories, and end with the stories of the participants outlined through example, guidance, and empowerment.

Challenging Questions
1. What is history from your perspective?
2. If you were to tell your story, who would be your audience?
3. If you had the platform, would you speak; and if so, how? 

Speakers
KJ

Kerrie Joy

Project VOYCE
I am a performance poet and public speaker committed to using my platform to shed light on systemic injustice while empowering oppressed and marginalized communities. I can not speak for an entire community but I strive to insert an often silenced voice through creativity and expression... Read More →


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Chameleon 004 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

The Hunter-Gatherer and the Farmer: A Forum Theatre Exercise
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: A forum theatre exercise: An early hunter-gatherer reaches for an apple that, unbeknownst to her, was grown by a farmer, who perceives it as his property.  Who is oppressing whom? 

Abstract: For well over 95% of our history as a species, we were hunter-gatherers with very little conception of property. Then came agriculture and those who labored on the land felt entitled to the fruits of that labor. In this forum theatre exercise, an early hunter-gatherer reaches for an apple he doesn’t realize was grown by a farmer who perceives it as his property. The farmer objects and with his “No,” the seeds of capitalism enter the stage of world history.  We will re-enact this world-forming scene, perhaps the most important interaction in the history of our species, as a forum-theatre exercise.  We'll explore many questions, amongst them:

1. The two characters are competing for a scarce resource: the apple. If one gets it, s/he wins, and the other does not, and loses. What possibilities are there for win-win, non-oppressive solutions to the dilemma? How could we use TO to develop those resolutions collectively and collaboratively?
2. Often in forum theatre exercises, it’s clear who the oppressor and oppressed are. But perhaps the question of who the oppressor is in this case is the central and abiding question of our world, even today: is the farmer oppressing the hunter-gatherer by withholding the apple, or is the hunter-gatherer oppressing the farmer by taking what is rightfully his? Is the farmer a proto-bourgeoisie exploiting the pro-proletarian hunter-gatherer by denying him the means of his sustenance, enclosing the commons of the pre-agricultural world or is the hunter-gatherer the proto-bourgeoisie exploiting the proto-proletarian farmer, denying him compensation for his labor?
3.    Generally, how can we use TO to explore situations in which the question "Who is the oppressor here?" is on the table? 

Challenging Questions
1. How can we use TO to explore situations in which the question "Who is the oppressor here?" is on the table?
2. How can TO help us resolve situations of competition and scarcity?
3. How do we most effectively guide TO participants to develop their own solutions to scenes of oppression? 

Speakers
KB

Ken Burak

Professor of Philosophy, Northampton Community College
I have been teaching Philosophy from a liberatory and social justice perspective for over twenty years and my work has been heavily influenced, in content and form, by the traditions of Friere and Boal.  My PhD dissertation title was "Logic and Resistance: Reading Hegel in the Age... Read More →


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Great Plains 006a/b (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

9:00am MDT

Creating Classroom Culture: Theatre of the Oppressed Games with Children
Limited Capacity seats available

Program Description: Explore a Theater of the Oppressed game series adapted for children to transform classroom culture around body-autonomy, sharing personal narratives, boundary setting, consent, and communication. 

Abstract: In both formal and informal learning spaces, children interpret and adopt the culture and rules of their social environment. These spaces provide an invaluable opportunity for youth and adults to co-create ways of being together that liberate as opposed to oppress. Based on work with 5-13 year old girls in an after school program, this workshop explores how the aspects of demechanization, dynamization, and group processing in Theater of the Oppressed games engage youth directly in practices of consent, boundary-setting, story sharing, and non-violent communication. The games, and the process by which they are facilitated, create a space where individual autonomy and personal truth is balanced with awareness of and accountability to the group.

Theater of the Oppressed games, and their engagement with issues of power and privilege, invite young folk into deep level of autonomy over their play space. They determine rules, values, and styles of communication authentic to them, instead of replicating the oppressive culture they encounter in adult spaces. The aspects of demechanization and dynamization provide youth a laboratory for group inquiry, revision, and creation. They are invited to determine the value of story sharing, non-violence, and bodily autonomy through their own experiences. This workshop will move through a series of Theater of the Oppressed games that were played with children over the course of a year in an after school program, where the goal was to create a community of peer support, inclusion, safety, and respect. It looks at the moments of dynamization and demechanization in these games, and how they provide experiences with bodily autonomy, story sharing, and non-violent communication for children. 

Challenging Questions
1. How can Theater of the Oppressed’s “Games for Actors and Non-Actors” create a body-inclusive and body-autonomous classroom culture?

2. How does TO support children in owning their own narratives & honoring the narratives of their peers?

3. How can TO support children in developing language around boundary setting, consent, and non-violent communication?  

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Giffin

Sarah Giffin

InsightfulPlay
I trained in Theater of the Oppressed with S. Leigh Thompson and Alex Santiago-Jirau through The Forum Project. From formal trainings to an Occupy the Stage project, to a few years with their forumperformance troupe, to more intimate community-based work, I had the privilege of working... Read More →


Sunday June 16, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am MDT
Aspen 003 (Lower Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA

10:45am MDT

Closing Session
Stop by the ballroom for an informal closing to the 2019 PTO Conference! Folks can share contact info with folks they'd like to keep in touch with while reflecting on the last few days together!

Sunday June 16, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am MDT
Ballroom (Main Level) 2200 Bonforte Blvd, Pueblo, CO 81001, USA